"The Country Wife" by Dana Gioia

She makes her way through the dark trees
Down to the lake to be alone.
Following their voices on the breeze,
She makes her way. Through the dark trees
The distant stars are all she sees.
They cannot light the way she's gone.
She makes her way through the dark trees
Down to the lake to be alone.

The night reflected on the lake,
The fire of stars changed into water.
She cannot see the winds that break
The night reflected on the lake
But knows they motion for her sake.
These are the choices they have brought her:
The night reflected on the lake,
The fire of stars changed into water.

 

Dana GioiaAnother poem from Rebel Angels: 25 Poets of the New Formalism a friend recommended. The form used here is double triolet (which I had to look up, as I barely understand poetry) defined as " a three stanza poem of eight lines. Its rhyme scheme is ABaAabAB and often all lines are in iambic tetrameter: the first, fourth and seventh lines are identical, as are the second and final lines, thereby making the initial and final couplets identical as well."

I liked this poem (tending to read in bed when grogginess comes galumphing in), and didn't even conceive that "the winds that break" would bring a laugh during alert waking hours.